Spanish Pop Lyrics

Translations of the best Spanish, French and German pop and rock songs

MOSCÚ ESTA HELADO by ESPLENDOR GEOMÉTRICO December 1, 2016

Filed under: 1980s,Esplendor Geometrico — spanishpoplyrics @ 8:17 am

It’s getting colder, and here’s a chilly track for you… Formed in 1980 by early members of Aviador Dro, Esplendor Geométrico combined the electronics of their former band with a harder industrial edge. This track is from 1981.

This year I have enjoyed listening to the podcasts of Simon Maxwell-Stewart, which I think date from 2010-2014 (as usual I have been a bit late picking up on things). “Moscú esta helado” is another track I discovered on “Rain in Spain”. Below is a list of 10 shows I particularly recommend. There are almost 100 of them, and they can be downloaded for free at archive.org: https://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22Simon+Maxwell-Stewart%22

05: PSYCHEDELIC FOLK

24: MODERN CLASSICAL

27: KID’S WORLD

51: GREEK ODYSSEY

69: CUMBIA & AFRO-CUBAN MUSIC

73: ART POP

76: RAIN IN SPAIN

79: DANCE PUNK

86: AMERICAN PRIMITIVISM

89: FIELD RECORDINGS

MOSCÚ ESTA HELADO

Moscú esta helado

Lenin tuerce la mirada
La muchedumbre lo aclama
Nadie está en la plaza roja
Nadie sale de la fábrica

Moscú esta helado 

Sopla el viento en los motores
Del gran tren Transiberiano
Sólo un agente de guardia
Solo en la sala de maquinas

Moscú esta helado 

Descansan las fresadoras
Los puentes vulcanizados
Las cintas transportadoras
Los ejes y las poleas

Moscú esta helado 
Todo esta helado
Moscú esta helado
MOSCOW IS FROZEN

Moscow is frozen

Lenin turns to look
The masses acclaim him
Nobody is in Red Square
Nobody leaves the factory

Moscow is frozen

The wind blows through the engines
Of the great Siberian railway
Only one guard on duty
Alone in the engine room

Moscow is frozen

The milling machines are resting
The vulcanised bridges
The transporter belts
The axles and pulleys

Moscow is frozen
Everything is frozen
Moscow is frozen
 

SEHNSUCHT by PURPLE SCHULZ & DIE NEUE HEIMAT November 25, 2016

Filed under: 1980s,German Pop Lyrics,Purple Schulz — spanishpoplyrics @ 8:31 am

GERMAN POP LYRICS

This atmospheric single is from 1984, and the semi spoken lyrics are relatively easy to understand if you are learning German. Purple Schulz started out in the NDW band Neue Heimat (New Homeland) before going solo. Apparently the title of this track is a reference to the poem of the same name by Joseph von Eichendorff.

NB The words below are for the full length album version (from ‘Hautnah’), which I can’t find a video for. The lyrics of the shorter single version are slightly different. More importantly, on the full version Schulz actually starts sobbing!

Schulz also recorded a version in English entitled “Heartsick”, and for once the English version is actually pretty good (see below).

SEHNSUCHT

Regen fällt, kalter Wind
Himmel grau, Frau schlägt Kind
Keine Nerven und so allein
Das Paradies kann das nicht sein

Männer taumeln müde nach Hause
Die kalte Seele fliegt hinaus
Kind muss weinen, Kind muss schreien
Schreien macht müde und Kind schläft ein

REFRAIN:
Ich habe Heimweh… 
Fernweh? 
Sehnsucht… 
Ich weiß nicht, was es ist

Keine Sterne in der Nacht
Kleines Kind ist aufgewacht
Kind fragt, ‘Wo die Sterne sind?’
‘Ach was weiß denn - ich mein Kind’

Ist der große schiefe Mond
Eigentlich von wem bewohnt
Warum ist der Himmel leer
Ist da oben keiner mehr? 

Ich habe Heimweh…

REFRAIN

Ich will nur fort…
Ganz weit fort…
Ich will raus! 

Warum hast Du mich geboren
Bevor ich da war, war ich schon verloren
Land der Henker, Niemandsland
Das Paradies ist abgebrannt

REFRAIN

Ich will nur weg…
Ganz weit weg…
Ich will raus!
LONGING

Rain falls, cold wind
Grey sky, woman hits child
No nerves and so alone
This can’t be Paradise

Men stagger tiredly home
The cold soul flies away
Child must cry, child must scream
Screaming becomes tired and child falls asleep

CHORUS:
I feel homesick…
Wanderlust? 
Longing…
I don't know what it is

No stars in the night
Small child is woken up
Child asks, ‘Where are the stars?’
‘Oh, what do I know, my child’

Is the big crooked moon
In fact, inhabited by whom?
Why is the sky empty
Is there nobody else up above? 

I feel homesick…

CHORUS

I want to get away…
Far, far away…
I want out! 

Why did you give birth to me
Before I was there, I was already lost
Land of executioners, no man's land
Paradise is burned down

CHORUS

I only want to go away…
Far, far away…
I want out!

 

 

 

DREIKLANGSDIMENSIONEN by RHEINGOLD November 19, 2016

Filed under: 1980s,German Pop Lyrics,Rheingold — spanishpoplyrics @ 8:19 am

GERMAN POP LYRICS

Rheingold were part of the Neue Deutsche Welle (NDW) scene. They were one of the first of these groups to enter the mainstream charts in Germany when this single made the top 20 in 1981. The playful lyrics are by Lothar Manteuffel who went on to work with Karl Bartos of Kraftwerk.

The group actually recorded a version of this song in English entitled “Triad Dimensions” (see below), which is OK if a bit awkward compared to the original. The chorus goes:

Triad dimensions keep singing

Light play impressions keep swinging

NB Thanks to Maria Schreier at Lyrics Translate for the original translation, though I have made a few changes: http://lyricstranslate.com/en/dreiklangsdimensionen-three-sound-dimensions.html

DREIKLANGSDIMENSIONEN 

Auftakt
im Takt
im Viertakt
soll es klingen
 
REFRAIN:
Dreiklangsdimensionen
sind taktvoll
Lichtspielimpressionen
sind farbvoll
 
Farbton
Halbton
und synchron
dazu schwingen
 
REFRAIN
 
Wohlklang
Illusionen
die um uns
herum tanzen
 
REFRAIN
 
Klänge
für Millionen
Überwinden
die Distanzen.
 
REFRAIN
 
Ausklang
Abgang
Sequenzen
ohne Grenzen.
 
REFRAIN
THREE DIMENSIONAL SOUNDS

Upbeat
On the beat
In four time
It should sound
 
CHORUS:
Three dimensional sounds
Are full of rhythm (1)
Playful light impressions
Are full of colour
 
Shade of color
Semitone
And synchronous
To swing to it
 
CHORUS
 
Harmony
Illusions
That dance
Around us
 
CHORUS
 
Sounds
For millions
Overcome
The distances
 
CHORUS
 
Conclusion (2)
Exit
Sequences
Without frontiers
 
CHORUS

(1) Taktvoll: I think this is a play on words. Literally it means ‘tactful’, but in context ‘full (voll) of rhythm (Takt)’ makes more sense.

(2) Ausklang means ‘conclusion’ but you could translate it as ‘sound (Klang) out (aus)’. I guess this ambiguity is intentional.

GERMAN GRAMMAR:

When you start learning German you can’t help but notice lots of ridiculously long and complicated looking words. Basically these are compound words, so to understand them you have to first recognise the constituent parts.  For example the title of this song breaks down into drei (three), Klang (sound) and Dimensionen (dimensions).  I think the band made up this word for the song, but it is still a good example of how German words can work.

 

LA BISE AUX HIPPIES by BRIGITTE BARDOT & SACHA DISTEL November 13, 2016

Filed under: 1960s,Brigitte Bardot,French Pop Lyrics,Serge Gainsbourg,Yé-Yé Girls — spanishpoplyrics @ 9:33 am

FRENCH POP LYRICS

Do you remember Jacques Dutronc taking the piss out of hippies in a previous post? Here Serge Gainsbourg has a go at them in a song from the same year: 1967. Bardot and Distel sang it on a TV show, with Serge himself playing guitar in the background.

LA BISE AUX HIPPIES

J'aime pas De Dion
J'aime pas Bouton
J'aime pas Aston
J'aime pas Martin

REFRAIN:
Mais j'aime faire la bise
La bise aux hippies
Oui, j'aime faire la bise
La bise aux hippies

J'aime pas Arthur
J'aime pas Rimbaud
J'aime pas Edgar
J'aime pas Poe

REFRAIN

J'aime pas Edoux
J'aime pas Samoëns
J'aime pas Otis
Pas plus que Pif

REFRAIN

J'aime pas Laurel
J'aime pas Hardy
J'aime pas Le Kid
J'aime pas Charlie

REFRAIN
KISS THE HIPPIES

I don't like De Dion
I don't like Bouton (1)
I don't like Aston
I don't like Martin

CHORUS:
But I like to kiss
Kiss the hippies
Yes, I like to kiss
Kiss the hippies

I don't like like Arthur
I don't like Rimbaud
I don't like Edgar
I don't like Poe

CHORUS

I don't like Edoux (2)
I don't like Samoëns
I don't like Otis
Nor Pif (3)

CHORUS

I don't like Laurel
I don't like Hardy
I don't like The Kid (4)
I don't like Charlie

CHORUS

(1) De Dion-Bouton was a French car manufacturer, popular in the late 19th and early 20th century.

(2) Félix Léon Edoux, a 19th century engineer famous for designing lifts.

(3) Pif et Hercule – a French cartoon strip featuring a dog (Pif) and a cat (Hercule).

(4) ‘The Kid’, a film from 1921 starring Charlie Chaplin.


 

KATHERINE by STEINWOLKE November 7, 2016

Filed under: 1980s,German Pop Lyrics,Steinwolke — spanishpoplyrics @ 8:26 am

GERMAN POP LYRICS

Steinwolke (Stonecloud) are another German New Wave band who are remembered as one hit wonders. Here is their big single “Katherine” from 1983. Actually these guys had a history, and they played a sophisticated kind of prog/jazz/folk fusion before jumping on the NDW bandwagon.

KATHERINE

Komm mit zu mir
Zu mir heut Nacht
Ich habe die ganze Zeit 
Nur an dich gedacht
Die Straße ist kalt 
Im Neonlicht
Der Regen fällt
Doch das stört mich nicht

REFRAIN:
Katherine, Katherine
Komm mit zu mir
Mit meiner Luxuslimousine 
Fahren wir zu mir
Katherine, Katherine 
Was ist los mit dir?
Steig in die Luxuslimousine
Und wir fahren zu mir

Die Leute drehen sich um
Haben uns noch nie gesehen
Ich frag mich bloß warum 
Alle im Gleichschritt gehen
Dass wir uns verstehen 
Habe ich gleich gewusst
Denn deine Augen leuchten 
Voller Liebeslust

REFRAIN
KATHERINE 

Come with me
To me tonight
I spend the whole time 
Only thinking of you
The street is cold 
In neon light
The rain is falling
But that doesn’t bother me 

CHORUS:
Katherine, Katherine 
Come with me
In my limousine 
We’ll drive together
Katherine, Katherine
What's wrong with you?
Get in the limousine 
And we’ll drive together

The people turn around
They have never seen us
I’m just wondering why
They’re all marching together
That we understand each other
I knew at once
Because your eyes are shining
Full of love and desire

CHORUS

GERMAN GRAMMAR:

The imperative in German (the informal ‘you’ form) for regular verbs can be formed just by chopping off the –en of the infinitive.

‘Come!’ is thus ‘Komm!’ (from the verb kommen), and they sound almost identical.

The pattern is rather similar to Spanish, where you say ‘¡Ven!’ (from the verb venir).

Also note the different first person singular pronouns in the song. We have Ich (I), Mich (My, direct objects) and Mir (to Me, indirect objects). Similarly for the second person singular (informal) we have Du, Dich and Dir.

Doch das stört mich nicht – But that doesn’t bother me

Komm mit zu mir – Come with me

Nur an dich gedacht – Only thinking of you

Was ist los mit dir? – What’s wrong with you?

This is the tip of a grammatical iceberg, but you have to start somewhere…

 

 

PELIGRO by MANO NEGRA November 1, 2016

Filed under: 1980s,Mano Negra,Manu Chao — spanishpoplyrics @ 7:57 am

Manu Chao has featured previously on this blog with his great song about the footballer Maradona. Before he went solo he fronted the band Mano Negra, and this song is from their second album “Puta’s Fever” (1989). There was a real anarchic spirit to this band, and the documentary ¡Pura Vida! (in a mixture of French and Spanish) is well worth watching.

PELIGRO

Cuidado en el barrio
Cuidado en la acera
Cuidado donde sea
Que te andan buscando
Los de la Seguridad
 
Cuidado en el campo
Cuidado en la frontera
Cuidado donde sea
Que van complotando
Los de la CIA
 
Peligroso esta el barrio
De Guatemala
Peligroso esta el barrio
De Nicaragua
 
Peligro
DANGER

Watch out in the neighbourhood
Watch out on the pavement
Watch out wherever you are
Because they are looking for you
Those in the security forces
 
Watch out in the countryside
Watch out on the border
Watch out wherever you are
Because they are plotting
Those in the CIA
 
The neighbourhood is dangerous
In Guatemala
The neighbourhood is dangerous
In Nicaragua
 
Danger

 

KLEINE KINDER by SUZANNE DOUCET October 25, 2016

Filed under: 1960s,German Pop Lyrics,Suzanne Doucet — spanishpoplyrics @ 8:05 am

GERMAN POP LYRICS

Suzanne Doucet released a series of singles in the mid-sixties in Germany. Like many of her contemporaries her songs often fell somewhere between Schlager and the hipper sounds being produced in France by the Yé-Yé girls.

By 1967 the hits were drying up and Doucet changed direction, moving towards a quieter folk based style. This song, which she wrote herself, was her entry to the Knokke Cup song festival. It’s a gentle protest song, completely different to the upbeat pop she was best known for. It didn’t win but the more thoughtful sound did revive her career.

NB I got the German lyrics from this blog: http://www.tantepop.de/2011/10/kleinode-deutschsprachiger-musik-26.html.

Also, thanks to various people at Lyrics Translate for suggesting improvements to my original translation.

KLEINE KINDER

Kleine Kinder
Kleine Kinder müssen spielen
Kleine Kinder
Wissen nicht womit sie spielen
 
Panzer, Blei und Zinnsoldaten
Blechkanonen, Pappgranaten,
Die die Eltern ihnen schenken
Ohne einmal nachzudenken…
 
Über Kinder
Kleine Kinder müssen sterben
Kleine Kinder
Wissen nicht wofür sie sterben
 
Ob für Vietnam und China
Ob für Kuba, Palästina
Was wir 1000 Kindern stehlen
Wenn wir einen Krieg befehlen
 
Im Vorübergehen
braucht man nicht so richtig hinzusehen
Im Vorübergehen
werden Mörder plötzlich groß und schön
 
Denn für bunte Spielzeugorden
darf man kleine Kinder morden
Trotz des Grauens aller Kriege
Diese ewig neue Lüge…
 
Große Kinder
Große Kinder wollen spielen
Große Kinder
Wissen längst womit sie spielen
 
Panzerkreuzer und Soldaten
Bomben, Flieger und Granaten
Die sie wieder Kindern schenken
Ohne einmal nachzudenken… über Kinder
LITTLE CHILDREN

Little children
Little children have to play
Little children
Don’t know what they’re playing with
 
Tanks, lead and tin soldiers
Metal toy cannons, cardboard shells
That their parents give them
Without even thinking…
 
About children
Little children have to die
Little children
Don’t know why they’re dying
 
Whether for Vietnam or China
Whether for Cuba, Palestine
What we steal from 1,000 children
When we order a war
 
In passing
One doesn’t need to look straight at it
In passing
Murderers are suddenly big and beautiful
 
Because for colorful toy medals
One may kill small children
Despite the horror of all wars
That same old lie that is always repeated...
 
Big children
Big children want to play
Big children
Already know what they’re playing with
 
Armoured cruisers and soldiers
Bombs, planes and shells
they give children again
Without even thinking… about children

GERMAN ADJECTIVES:

I decided to have a look at German adjectives in this post, hoping they would be relatively simple, but I seem to have opened a can of worms…

In Germany when you order a beer you often get the reply ‘Groß oder klein?’ (‘Big or small?’)

Here we use the root form of the adjective ‘klein’. However, in the title of the song ‘Kleine Kinder’ the adjective ‘klein’ comes with an ‘e’ is added.  Why?

If you use a definite article then the gender of the noun makes no difference and an –e is added to the adjective in all instances. However, an extra –n is added to the plural.

Masculine: (schnell / fast): Der schnelle Tiger (the fast tiger).

Feminine: (jung / young): Die junge Dame (the young lady).

Neuter: (klug / clever): Das kluge Kind (the clever child).

Plural: (gut / good): Die guten Bücher (the good books).

However, for indefinite articles the pattern is different. Masculine nouns add –er, Feminine  nouns add –e and neuter nouns add –es. For plurals (with no article) you add –e.

Masculine: (schnell / fast): Ein schneller Tiger (a fast tiger).

Feminine: (jung / young): Eine junge Dame (a young lady).

Neuter: (klug / clever): Ein kluges Kind (a clever child).

Plural: (gut / good): Gute Bücher (good books).

This is confusing, but one tip is to use the definite articles to help you remember this pattern:

Masculine: Der Tiger => Ein schneller Tiger (a fast tiger).

Feminine:  Die Dame => Eine junge Dame (a young lady).

Neuter: Das Kind => Ein kluges Kind (a clever child).

Plural:  Die Bücher => Gute Bücher (good books).

So finally we can see why the title of the song is ‘Kleine Kinder’ – Kinder is plural and there is no article so an –e is added to the adjective.

NB Above I only considered the Nominative case, the simplest case in German.

Please note that most of the examples here are taken from this excellent article: http://german.speak7.com/german_adjectives.htm